Why the Parable of the Savers Drives Me Nuts (Or, Late Bloomers and Humanities Majors Are Not Doomed)

NotDoomedI’ve written time and time again in the last year about how much I’ve learned from the PF blogosphere: budgeting, investing basics, debt payoff strategies, frugal tips, and more. But there’s one post in particular that makes me groan every time I see a variation on it. It’s the “parable of the savers,” and you’ve seen it at least a hundred times if you’ve been reading around PF blogs for long. You know the one: John invests $5 a year starting at age 5, and stops at age 20. When he’s 65, this total $75 investment has grown to $3,000,000 through the magic of compound interest. Jane, meanwhile, lives it up, buys expensive cars and too many pairs of shoes, and doesn’t put anything away until she’s 45. She’s making a good salary by then, so she socks away $5000 a year, but she still only ends up with $150,000, and has to live in a van down by the river and eat cat food in her old age. Continue reading “Why the Parable of the Savers Drives Me Nuts (Or, Late Bloomers and Humanities Majors Are Not Doomed)”

Why I Don’t Percentage-Budget

BudgetUpThere seem to be two schools of thought on budgeting. One suggests certain percentages of your monthly net income to allocate to certain categories: no matter how much you make, spend 30% on housing, 30% on life expenses, 10% on saving, etc. So, with a net income of $1000 monthly, you’d look for housing costing $300 and save $100; with a net income of $5000 monthly, you’d look for housing costing $1500 and save $500. Continue reading “Why I Don’t Percentage-Budget”

On a more cheerful note

My side hustling plan is off to a decent start! So far I have:

(1) made $355.79 from a combination of selling things on amazon and ebay, watching usertesting.com like a hawk, and skimming a little more than $100 off last month’s paycheck. I did that last accidentally, by the way, through double-transferring money from my checking account to the new savings account I set up to fund Roth shares. I am not a financial master of the universe. But having made the transfer I decided to let it stand, rather than pulling it back and using it for cash spending, so even though it is technically from my paycheck, I’m calling it a side hustle I pulled on myself.

(2) Talked to a friend of mine about booking me for a paid lecture in the fall (I am not sure how much this will be, maybe no more than a couple hundred dollars, but every little bit counts.)

(3) Mentioned to a few friends, in a casual and low-key way thus far, that I am looking for writing, editing, and, what the hell, pet- and baby-sitting work. By the way! Anyone reading this: I am looking for writing and editing work! Feel free to get in touch 🙂

(4) Signed up for a new checking/savings account that theoretically will give me $20 a month — apparently in perpetuity — for using direct deposit and billpay. By the end of this year, if this works, that would be $140. Again, repeat after me: every little bit counts.

I am not getting too excited yet, because I still have, uh, $5144.21 to go on my “fund the Roth using extra income” plan, and obviously I’m going to have to acquire more lucrative part-time work than I’ve done so far. But setting the goal and already making some progress feels good; I’m going to buy in $250 increments so I can do the first lot as soon as the money’s available in my savings account.

The Biological Savings Clock

One reason to start this blog is to keep me going as I finish hacking away at the student loan debt (how I acquired it and what I’ve been doing about it will be the subject of a future post.) But another one is to have a space to think through issues relating to making a more conscious turn towards the future: that is to say, emergency funds, savings funds, retirement funds. These things kind of freak me out.

Until a couple of weeks ago, I’d lived my whole adult life without getting into catastrophic debt, but also without any kind of financial margin or plan that looked beyond the next paycheck. From 22 to 34, I lived in the aforementioned giant expensive city; first I was a freelancer, then I was a grad student. Even the year that I made a grand total of $12,000, I did all right. I lived in cheap neighborhoods, with roommates, took public transportation, rarely ate out. But one thing I never did was establish any kind of permanent savings account. I didn’t work for anyone that had a 401(k); I never set up an IRA; I always had a regular savings account, but routinely drained it to pay for either normal living expenses (when I was between jobs) or travel.

You know how some women have the biological clock kick in around my age? They must have a baby right now or they’ll die? Yeah, I had one of those moments two weeks ago, except in my case it was about how I had to have an IRA, right this second.

Really, it felt like a switch flipped in my brain. One minute I kind of vaguely knew that at some point in the future, after I paid off the student loan and built up an emergency fund, I should start a retirement account. And the next minute I was frantically researching Roth vs. traditional, and how do you open the damn things anyway? Suddenly I just could not get enough, and I spent countless hours clicking around the various websites you get when you google “paying down student loans vs. retirement savings” and other search strings to that effect.

Reader, I drained my emergency savings funds again. But this time instead of going to Europe, or paying my rent after a down month, I put $2000 in a Vanguard target retirement fund. (Roth, in case you were wondering. It seems like a way better deal.)

It kind of makes me laugh, because hello, I’m 35, I have no job currently lined up for after July 2015, I don’t really know what I want to do with my career or what city I’m going to end up in…but hey, I guess I have a little something put by. A very little something. But maybe it’ll grow.

Introducing Me (And My Slowly Growing But Still Negative Net Worth)

Hello to anyone reading this; thanks for being here.

I’m a 35-year-old, permanently (at least as far as I know) single woman. I’m not complaining about that — singleness has its pros as well as cons! But….

As this article notes, single people face some particular issues when it comes to cash flow, housing costs, and retirement savings. (See also this post by Krystal Yee, which got me thinking about this topic a lot.) Those things are definitely on my mind right now. And what with singleness being one of the key factors in my financial life right now, I figured I’d make it the title of this blog, which I’m starting after a couple of weeks of fairly intensive reading around in the personal finance blogosphere. It seems like a really good way to keep myself motivated as I move forward; I like the thought of sharing my journey, which in some ways is well underway and in some ways is just beginning.

Here’s the big-picture snapshot of my financial situation, which shows you both “well underway” and also “just beginning”:

That’s my net worth, starting in June 2013, when I was (thanks, mint.com, for the precision) $21,249 in debt, of which nearly $19,000 was embedded in student loans that were about to begin coming due. I also had $5629 of “assets” (the little green bar) but since $3500 of that is the value of my car, we were really talking…not that much. But counting the car, that brought my net worth in at negative $15,619.

June 2013 was a big month for me; I graduated from a humanities PhD program, located in a Giant Expensive City, and moved to a much smaller, much cheaper city to take a fortunately very well-paid, by humanities PhD standards, but unfortunately only 1-year, job. The move was expensive, since it required buying a fair amount of furniture (long story), but nevertheless, as the summer and fall went on, I started throwing chunks of money at the student debt pretty regularly. So I’ve arrived at the end of March, 2014, with $7703 in debt and a net worth of negative $1034 (still including the car!) The student loan stands at $7558. In other words, I’ve paid over $11,000 on the student loan in nine months. By putting basically all my extra income towards it over the next few months, I hope to have it entirely paid off by August.

This is great, and I’m glad I’ve been able to tackle the loan to this extent, but it still leaves me with a lot of question marks about my financial future, which I’ll tackle in my next post.

[Edit, December 15, 2014: Shortly after beginning this blog, I removed the “value” of my car from my net worth numbers, on the grounds that there’s really no sense in which it’s liquid; this is why elsewhere on the site you’ll see my “starting” net worth, in June 2013, listed at -$19119, and all subsequent net worth updates don’t include the value of my car. I decided to leave this introductory post as is, though, because of the screenshot! The debt numbers in it are accurate, but the assets are too high.]